Mental health is important and thankfully there is more awareness on this subject than ever before, but some people, particularly of older generations, may find it difficult to admit struggling with their mental health. However, many are suffering more than ever before, following an extended period of isolation during the Covid-19 pandemic.

The symptoms of depression

As many as one in five people will experience depression during their lifetime and symptoms can include lack of motivation or interest in things you used to enjoy, feeling tired, sleeping too much or too little, change in appetite, losing confidence in yourself, feeling life is pointless, being self-critical, feeling guilty and/or having suicidal thoughts.

The symptoms of anxiety

Anxiety is also a common mental health issue and common symptoms are feeling restless, irritable, having a racing heartbeat, dry mouth, nausea, sweating and/or trouble breathing.

The causes of depression and anxiety

Depression and anxiety can be caused by any number of reasons or for no reason at all. Common causes can be financial issues, bereavement, relationship issues, family issues, retirement, disability, poor health, stress, weather, isolation, or loneliness. But the feelings are valid and there are many ways to manage these feelings such as counselling, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT), antidepressants, increased exercise, and meditation as well as other simple things you can do to improve your wellbeing such as getting outside, taking a walk, joining groups, taking up new activities or being creative.

Reach out for support

Whether you are struggling yourself or feel a loved one is having mental health issues, it is important to reach out for support and talk to somebody – be that a friend, GP, counsellor, or helpline.

Some people may experience mental health issues as they get older because of health problems associated with old age, finding it harder to get out and about, feeling lonely or isolated, bereavement or suddenly becoming a carer for a loved one.

How visiting and live-in care can help with mental health

Visiting and live-in care can be helpful for some of these issues – providing companionship for those experiencing loneliness and isolation if they live alone and do not have family living locally or able to visit often. Carers can help with household tasks such as shopping, housework, and assistance with personal care, but can also be a lifeline for providing company, someone to talk to and a friendly face.

A carer can also help support a family carer, helping to take some of the pressure off when it comes to caring for a loved one. It can be a huge change and demand to provide round the clock care for someone as well as put strain on a relationship, so investing in visiting or live-in care can provide a vital lifeline. Allowing for a family carer to have respite and time to themselves.

Get in touch with Fambridge Care today

If you would like to find out more about how we can provide mental health support for the elderly and help you as a visiting and live in care agency please don’t hesitate to get in touch with us to discuss your needs.